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I almost got into a conversation with an Arch user who hadn't updated his system in a year and was remarkably proud of this fact. He was about to begin the update. I was tempted to stick around and watch the disaster unfold but decided against. I can't believe anyone wouldn't update their Arch install in a year. Remember folks, these people walk amongst us, they express opinionsand can vote. Scary shit.

@Schlumpf23 Ia know what scares me more: Most people use Windows and Microsoft has to literally force them to update there computer. And if you want a Modern Mobile device you have the choice between 2 systems full of forced consent and surveillance. Now that's scary.

@Schlumpf23

What is even the point of being on Arch then ? Isn't being on the bleeding edge kind of one of the main draws of Arch ?

@PublicNuisance @Schlumpf23 I have done this and it has gone fine... It was on a machine I hadn't needed for a while. I don't understand why rolling release has a rep of being unstable...

@shellkr

Oh I agree about the rep. I've run Manjaro; Solus and OpenSuse Tumbleweed and never had any more issues than Mint gave me. Which is to say all have been mostly smooth sailing.

@shellkr @PublicNuisance
I don't either. I've been using Arch for 9yrs and any disasters I've had have been my faults experimenting. Honestly, Arch once properly maintained is one of the most stable distros going.

@PublicNuisance Absolutely. I try to update at least once a day depending on what the updates are and what I'm using for my system for, i.e.writing etc. It's the whole point of a bleeding edge for otherwise something like Debian sounds more suitable to that particular user.

@PublicNuisance I don't know. Yup, being on the bleeding edge is the exact point of being on Arch is remarkably stable when taken care of properly.

@Schlumpf23 As a #nixos user, this is precisely the reason I put up with weird dev environments. Its doesn't matter if I update every day or every decade. It doesn't matter if update breaks something. All I have to do is reboot, select any previous config, and I am back at working system no questions asked.

@Schlumpf23 documentation is less than perfect, but nix-pills is highly recommended. It should set you off to great start

nixos.org/nixos/nix-pills/

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Linux.Pizza

A instance dedicated - but not limited - to people with an interest in the GNU+Linux ecosystem and/or general tech. Sysadmins to enthusiasts, creators to movielovers - Welcome!